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181 Neave, Christiane Corty L'ETOILE. Adapted from the French of Christiane Corty Neave
Paris: Imprimerie "Le Soleil", 1966. 1966. Very good 
Paris: Imprimerie "Le Soleil", 1966.. 1966.. Very good. - Quarto [11 inches high by 9 inches wide], red cloth titled in gilt. The covers are very lightly rubbed. 90 pages. Full-page & textual illustrations & 1 folding plate in black & white. Very good.

Limited edition of 1,000 numbered copies.

The history of the creation of the Place d'Etoile and the Arc de Triomphe in Paris. 
Price: 25.00 USD

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182 Nichols, John (1745-1826) under the pseudonym of Sylvanus Urban THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE: AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. For the Year MDCCXCI. Volume LXI. (2 volumes, complete from January through December 1791)
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street; for David Henry, late of St. John's G 1791. Very good 
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street; for David Henry, late of St. John's Gate. And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate-Street, 1791.. 1791.. Very good. - Octavo, 8-3/4 inches high by 5-1/4 inches wide. Two volumes bound in contemporary brown calf with gilt-titled red leather labels between raised bands on the spines. The covers are rubbed and scuffed and the corners and head and tail of the spines are bumped and worn. The leather is splitting along the top of the first volume's rear joint. The head of the spines are chipped and there is a piece out from the head of the second volume's spine. The pagination of the first volume is as follows, pp. [i]-iv, [5]- 288, [297]-592 plus a 16 page index (pages 289-296 are skipped in the numbering, as issued, but the text is complete). The second volume's pagination is as follows: Title, pp. 592-1,242, including the supplement, plus a 16 page index. The set is illustrated with a total of 39 plates, including one folding, and a few woodcuts including title vignettes and the mastheads depicting St. John's Gate adorning the title page of each issue. The pages are lightly toned and there is offsetting to the endpapers and pastedowns. There are occasional minor stains and a few page corners are creased. There is slight damage to the top of the foreedge of the first volume and a couple of tiny holes to the front margin of one plate. Very good.

Founded in 1731, "The Gentleman's Magazine" was the first periodical to use the word "magazine", from the French word for storehouse, in its title.

The 39 plates illustrating these volumes include an engraving of the S.W. View of Marsden Church; an engraving of a Gentoo Fanatick suffering Voluntary Torture; the New Bridge at Derry; the Place House in Horton; a View of Burghope House; a View of Clifton near Bristol; a View of the Ruins of Clomines; and a View of Bristol.

The content of this iconic periodical includes extracts of letters of Governor Phillip to Lord Sydney (page 271 of the March issue), written from Botany Bay, Australia, discussing the potential of various locations along the branches of the rivers for settlement. The obituary of Charles Wesley, regarded as the father of Methodism, appears on page 282 of that same issue: "From the exact method in which they disposed of each hour, they acquired the nick-name of Methodists, and are the only people who take to themselves a term first given in reproach. The ridicule and contempt which this singular conduct produced, John and Charles Wesley were well qualified to bear." James Boswell's poem "Ode To Mr. Charles Dilly" appears on page 367 of the April issue. The obituary of the English Antiquary and Lexicographer Francis Grose (1731-1791) who illustrated architectural remains is of particular interest. In the May 1, 2009 issue of the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, J. Barry Ferriss makes a case for Grose having suffered from Obstructive Sleep Apnoea Syndrome: "Short as well as corpulent, he was said to be only five feet tall, while weighing 22 stone.... Robert Burns called him 'a fine, fat, fodgel wight, o'stature short, but genius bright.'" Grose's obituary is published on pages 492 through 494 of the May issue. A letter by Junius entitled "An Explanatory Address to the People of England on the late memorable Decision against the Abolition of the Slave Trade" (page 537 of the June issue) passionately speaks against the slave trade: "... for, if there ever was a subject calculated to call forth the latent powers of the soul, to interest her affections, to colour the cheek with shame, or make us burn with indignation, it is the cause of the much-injured Africans." A pair of Sonnets [number 92 and 97] by Anna Seward appear on page 564 of that same issue and, on page 569, under the heading of "Foreign Intelligence" is given an "Accurate Detail of the Polish Revolution". "Dr. Johnson's Letter to Earl of Chesterfield", penned by Johnson in February of 1755, appears on the verso of the title page to the second volume. A report on the Oxford Music Festival appears on page 669 of the July issue. A lengthy "Letter on the Slave Trade from the Honourable Mr. C. lately Member of Parliament for the County of Derby, to the Rev. Dr. B. of Grosvenor-street", printed on pages 707 through 713 of the August issue is probably authored by Daniel Parker Coke: "To commerce we owe our glory, let us respect and honour the name; but a traffick in human blood profanes that name; it is a libel upon the character of Commerce, and a blot in that of every nation by which it is exercised." Two poems on page 852: "The Beggar's Petition" by Thomas Moss and "The Poor Man's Prayer, written in 1766, Addressed to the Earl of Chatham by Dr. Roberts" are illustrated with a woodcut. John Wolcot's poem "The Magpie and Robin Red-Breast", written under the pseudonym of Peter Pindar is published on page 950 of the October issue. The lengthy obituary of William Gibson, the extraordinary self-taught mathematician, is printed on pages 1,062 through 1,064 of the November issue. The "New Constitution of the Government of Poland, As established by the Revolution, May 3, 1791" appears on pages 1,193 though 1,196 of the Supplement followed by the new "French Constitution, established Aug. 4, 1791" on pages 1,197 through 1,206. The Irish statesman Henry Flood's biography appears on pages 1,224 through 1,233 of the Supplement. There is a brief mention of the death of Mozart on page 1,165: "By his death the musical world will sustain an irreparable loss".

A wonderful 18th century periodical which provides insight into the intellectual culture of the period with its coverage of politics, current affairs and news, history and literature. 
Price: 500.00 USD

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183 Nichols, John (1745-1826) under the pseudonym of Sylvanus Urban THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE: AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. For the Year MDCCXCV. Volume LXV. (2 volumes, complete from January through December 1795)
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of 1795. Very good 
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate-Street, 1795.. 1795.. Very good. - Octavo, 8-1/2 inches high by 5-1/4 inches wide. Two volumes bound in contemporary brown calf with gilt-titled red leather labels between raised bands on the spines. The front cover of the second volume is detached and the leather is splitting along the rear joint of that volume. The covers are rubbed and scuffed and the corners and head and tail of the spines are bumped and worn with minor chipping to the head of the second volume's spine. The pagination of the first volume is as follows, pp. [i]-iv, [1]- 160, [443-440], 169-536. The second volume's pagination is as follows: pp. i-ii, [537]-1,115 plus a 32 page index. The first volume lacks pages 161- 168. In their place are bound pages 433-440 which are then repeated in the May issue. The set is illustrated with a total of 34 plates and a few woodcuts including title vignettes and the mastheads depicting St. John's Gate adorning the title page of each issue. The pages are lightly toned. There are occasional minor stains and the top corners of a few pages are bumped. Very good.

Founded in 1731, "The Gentleman's Magazine" was the first periodical to use the word "magazine", from the French word for storehouse, in its title.

The 34 plates illustrating these volumes include an illustration of the "Turkish Ambassador's Public Entry" in a grand horse-drawn carriage; an illustration of Kedleston Church; the Chapel at Honiton; An engraving with 3 views of "Putley Cross"; a landscape engraving of "Matlock Torr" at the top right of which is inserted a vignette of an insect and its larvae; and an engraving of "Dromoland Castle".

The content of this iconic periodical includes Revolutionary War period letters between General Gage and General George Washington. These consist of "General Gage's Answer to General Washington" from August 13th, 1775 (page 899 of the November 1795 issue) and "General Washington's Reply" from his headquarters in Boston; Sir Adam Williamson's Proclamation at Hispaniola appears on pages 666 through 668 of the August 1795 issue. A British army officer and colonial governor, Williamson had seen service during the American Revolution, participating in the Battle of Bunker Hill. Later, when war with Spain threatened in 1790, he was appointed as Lieutenant-Governor and garrison commander in Jamaica, subsequently replacing the Governor upon the later's death in 1791. He was praised for his "mildness" and for maintaining calm after the outbreak of a major slave uprising in St. Domingue. After the outbreak of War with France in 1793 Williamson, who had cultivated good relations with the French colonists who had earlier fled to Jamaica during the uprising, sent troops into St. Domingue starting a 5 year military occupation of that colony. He was made a knight of the Bath following the capture of Port-au- Prince and appointed Governor of St. Domingue. Humane and generous, he sought to foster colonial support by spending his and the government's money. Though well-liked, corruption flourished around him. Insurrection and disease also took heavy tolls on British troops and he was recalled in October 1795, leaving the colony in March of 1796. A debate on the authorship of "God Save the King" appears on page 992 of the December issue. Authorship of the tune has, over the years, been attributed to Jean- Baptiste Lully, James Oswald, Dr. Rogers, Dr. Henry Carey, and Dr. John Bull. Although Carey is frequently cited as the author, he apparently never claimed it as his. In that same vein, a letter by "A Rambler" on page 993 takes exception to Hannah More's publication of "A Lancashire Collier-Girl". Apparently Hannah More had made alterations to this story authored by "A Rambler" which was originally published on page 197 of the March 1795 issue of this periodical. The author, "A Rambler", was a pseudonym for Joseph Budworth (later Joseph Palmer). The "Proceedings of the National Convention of France", here published on pages 337-339 of the April 8, 1795 issue includes Robespierre's 11 Decrees. These included resolutions stating that the French nation acknowledges the existence of a Supreme Being and the immortality of the soul; also outlining the duties of man, among which are the detestation of treachery and tyranny, the punishment of traitors, the defense of the oppressed, and the freedom of religious worship. He also proclaimed the establishment of festivals to celebrate the glorious events of the revolution. Robert Harrington's "Modern Theory of Respiration, as misapplied to Medicine" here appears on page 219 and is continued on page 400. Harrington was a virulent opponent of Priestley and Watt. Henry Dimock's poem "A Sacred Ode on the Marriage of his Royal Highness George Prince of Wales with the Princess Caroline of Brunswick" appears in Hebrew on page 420 of the May issue. A poem in a French Patois is published with its modern French translation on page 684. And, "Reanimation: A Hymn for the Massachusetts Humane Society" by Mrs. Morton of Boston is here published on page 864.

A wonderful 18th century periodical which provides insight into the intellectual culture of the period with its coverage of politics, current affairs and news, history and literature. 
Price: 375.00 USD

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184 Nichols, John (1745-1826) under the pseudonym of Sylvanus Urban. AN 18TH CENTURY ILLUSTRATION WITH A DESCRIPTION AND EXPLANATION OF THE FRENCH TELEGRAPH [Published in THE NOVEMBER 1794 ISSUE OF "THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE: AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. For the Year MDCCXCIV."]
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of 1794. Fair. 
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate-Street, 1794.. 1794.. Fair.. - Octavo, 8-1/8 inches high by 5-1/8 inches wide. Softcover, the complete November issue disbound and removed at some time in the past from a larger bound volume of these periodicals. 96 pages in all, consisting of pages [969] through [1,064], illustrated with a title vignette masthead depicting St. John's Gate adorning the title page and 3 full-page plates, including an illustration of the "French Telegraph". The pages are toned and several pages and signatures are detached The top and front edges of page 983 are chipped with some slight loss. There is some occasional foxing and soiling and a few page corners are creased.

The complete November 1794 issue of this periodical.

On page 992 is printed an "Explanation of the Machine (Telegraphe) placed on the Mountain of Bellville near Paris, for the Purpose of Communicating Intelligence". The article is accompanied by an illustration of the "French Telegraphe" on the facing page. Claude Chappe developed the system for the French optical telegraph in the 1790's, approximately 50 years before Morse's electro- mechanic telegraph. Using a system of semaphore signals making up 92 configurations, Chappe developed a code book with 92 pages, each with 92 lines. Entire messages could be transmitted across France via telegraph stations placed nearly 6 miles apart. 
Price: 150.00 USD

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185 Nichols, John (1745-1826) under the pseudonym of Sylvanus Urban. AN 18TH CENTURY ILLUSTRATION WITH A SIGNIFICANT ARTICLE ON PLASTIC SURGERY, IT BEING THE FIRST REPORT PUBLISHED IN EUROPE ON THE HINDU METHOD OF RHINOPLASTY. [Published in THE OCTOBER & DECEMBER 1794 ISSUES OF "THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE: AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. For the Year MDCCXCIV."]
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of 1794. Fair. Signed
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate-Street, 1794.. 1794.. Fair.. 1794 DESCRIPTION OF THE HINDU METHOD OF RHINOPLASTY WITH A PLATE - Octavo, 8-1/8 inches high by 5-1/8 inches wide. Softcovers, the complete October and December issues disbound and removed at some time in the past from a larger bound volume of these periodicals. 192 pages in all, consisting of pages [873] through [968] and pages [1,065] through [1,160], each issue illustrated with a title vignette masthead depicting St. John's Gate adorning the title page. These two issues are further illustrated with 6 full-page plates, including an engraved portrait of a turbaned Indian man with vignette insert figures illustrating the steps of this early plastic surgery performed in India in the 18th century to reconstruct a nose. The engraving illustrates the articles on the subject which appear on pages 891 and 1,093 of these 2 issues. The pages are toned and several pages and signatures are detached. An early owner's name, partially cropped, is penned at the top of each title page. There are a couple of short tears. There is some occasional foxing and soiling and a few page corners are creased.

The complete October and December 1794 issues of this periodical.

Most noteworthy is the early description of plastic surgery under the heading of "Curious Surgical Operation" describing a surgical procedure performed in India to replace a man's nose, grafting skin over wax to build a new nose. This procedure is illustrated in the plate facing page 883 showing a portrait of a turbaned man whose nose has thus been replaced above vignettes illustrating the steps involved in the procedure. A further article, appearing on page 1,093, takes exception with the earlier author's statement that such a procedure is unknown in the West, quoting Butler's "Hudibras" which asserts that Taliacotius, surgeon to the Grand Duke of Tuscany had laid out a similar procedure and citing reference to a similar feat of plastic surgery having been performed on a virgin by the Italian surgeon Griffonius in the 1590's and that a chapter in "Chirurgorum Comes", printed in 1687, is dedicated to the subject. Rhinoplasty is said to have originated with the Hindu surgeon Susrata somewhere around the year 500. A description of his method was translated into Arabic in the 700s and into English in the 18th century. Other methods of rhinoplasty included that developed in Italy by Gaspare Tagliacozzi in the 1500's, but British interest in the Indian method of total rhinoplasty, fully described in the article signed "B.L." was partly spurred on by Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore, offering rewards and bounties for noses, ears or bullocks brought back after a raid. Syphilis also contributed to the interest in the procedure. This article by B.L. (the anonymous author who was thought by some to be Colley Lucas and by others to be Barak Longmate, the engraver of the plate illustrating the article) fired the imagination of the surgeon John Constantine, who practiced on corpses, and of John Carpue who, in 1816, published his results in a landmark work. The article published in the form of a letter in "The Gentleman's Magazine" was the first report published in Europe on the Hindu method of rhinoplasty. 
Price: 750.00 USD

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186 Nichols, John (1745-1826) under the pseudonym of Sylvanus Urban. [A SIGNIFICANT ARTICLE ON PLASTIC SURGERY BEING THE FIRST REPORT PUBLISHED IN EUROPE ON THE HINDU METHOD OF RHINOPLASTY]: THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE: AND HISTORICAL CHRONICLE. For the Year MDCCXCIV. Volume LXIV. (2 volumes, complete from January through December 1794).
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of 1794. Very good Signed
London: Printed by John Nichols, at Cicero's Head, Red Lion Passage, Fleet-Street: And sold by Eliz. Newbery, the Corner of St. Paul's Church Yard, Ludgate-Street, 1794.. 1794.. Very good. - Octavo, 8-1/2 inches high by 5-1/4 inches wide. Two volumes bound in contemporary brown calf with gilt-titled red leather labels between raised bands on the spines. The covers are rubbed and scuffed and the corners and head and tail of the spines are bumped and worn. The leather is splitting along the front joint of the second volume and also at the bottom of the rear joint of that same volume. The pagination of the first volume is as follows, pp. [i]-iv, [1]-584. The second volume's pagination is as follows: pp. [i-ii], [585]-1,160 plus a 22 page index. The set is illustrated with a total of 39 plates, diagrams on pages 419 & 1,176, and a few woodcuts including title vignettes and the mastheads depicting St. John's Gate adorning the title page of each issue. Page 392, which contained "Each Day's Price of Stocks in April..." is damaged and has been repaired with early paper mounted with glue, resulting in substantial loss to the chart. The plate facing page 793 has been bound upside down and pages 1,111-1,112 are present but mis-bound before page 1,107. The hinges of the front covers are starting to crack. The pages are lightly toned. There are occasional minor stains and the top corners of a few pages are bumped. Very good.

Founded in 1731, "The Gentleman's Magazine" was the first periodical to use the word "magazine", from the French word for storehouse, in its title.

The 39 plates illustrating these volumes include a full-page engraving of the "East View of St. Malo"; an engraving with "Views in Dovedale"; an engraving of the Penshurst Oak"; a portrait of "St. William King of Scots, Surnamed the Lyon"; an engraving of the "French Telegraph"; and an engraved portrait of a turbaned Indan man with vignette insert figures illustrating the steps of this early plastic surgery performed in India in the 18th century to reconstruct a nose. The engraving illustrates the articles on the subject which appear on pages 891 and 1,093 of this work.

The content of this iconic periodical includes James Boswell's lengthy response to Anna Seward's second attack on himself and Samuel Johnson (page 32 of the January issue). Dr. Robert Harrington's argument with Priestley in regards to his pamphlet on "Experiments on the Generation of Air from Water" appears on page 36 under the heading "A New Year's Gift to Dr. Priestly on the Subject of the Generation of Air from Water" and is continued on page 133; W. Williams essay on the Invention of Printing is published on page 41; James Peller Malcolm's essay on Yellow Fever at Philadelphia appears on page 101 of the February issue. Printed on page 212 are "Observations on the Jewish Festival of the New Moon", with quotes in Hebrew; Under the heading "An appeal to the Publick, particularly to the Officers of the Army and Navy, serving in the West Indies, and other hot Climates", on page 422, is a two- and-a-half page essay by Francis Newbery on James's Powder which was no longer being supplied following the death of Mr. Adair, the Surgeon- General to the Army. Newbery asserts that James's Powder is a substantially more effective remedy for the illnesses which have proven fatal to those serving in those climates than the "Pulvis Antimonialis" which the College of Physicans has endorsed as a substitute. James's Powder was patented as a fever powder in 1747 by the English physician Robert James (1703-1776). A friend of Samuel Johnson, James was the author of the three-volume "Medical Dictionary". Samuel Johnson wrote the "proposals" as well as several of the articles for James' dictionary. Taken up and translated into French by Diderot, Toussaint and Eidous, it remained a popular work until Mark Twain criticized it in 1890. James's Powder, a compound of antimony and phosphate of lime has been attributed as a factor in the death of Oliver Goldsmith. An attack on Priestly for leaving England and going to America on page 428 suggests that it was due to Harrington's article which we mentioned earlier in this description. Robert Burn's "Sonnet On the Death of Robt. Riddell, Esq. of Glenriddel", here published on page 461 of the May 1794 issue, was first published in "The Dumfires Journal" on April 22nd, 1794 below the announcement of Captain Robert Riddell's death. It subsequently appeared in the "London Morning Chronicle" of May 5th, 1794 and then here in the May issue of "The Gentleman's Magazine". On page 493 appears an account of a Naval victory by a "Naval Correspondent of high Rank". This is an account of the naval engagement of June 1st, 1794 between British and French fleets, considered to be the hardest-fought battle between France and Britain in the 18th Century. On page 708 of the second volume, under the heading "Particular Narrative of the Late Embassy to China" appears a four page account of the Macartney Embassy, the first British diplomatic mission to China which took place in 1793. Meeting with the Qianlong Emperor, the mission failed in achieving any of its goals which included seeking to open new ports for British trade, the relaxation of trade restrictions, setting up a permanent embassy in Beijing and cession of a small island for British use. Dr. William Charles Wells "Reply to Dr. [Robert] Darwin on Vision" appears on pages 794 through 797 of the September issue and continues on pages 905 through 907 of the October issue. Wells, a Scottish-American physician was responsible for some important medical research and made the first clear statement about natural selection. He was, throughout his career, particularly interested in the subject of vision which this essay appearing within the pages of this periodical addresses. Referring to these very articles printed in "The Gentleman's Magazine" Wade, in his work "Perception and Illusion: Historical Perspective" (page 154) states that "Wells offers a very early report of the possible lack of visual perception during eye movements in the context of post-rotational vision". On page 815 of the September issue, an article comments on the invention of the telegraph, a subject which is again taken up on page 992 of the November issue with an "Explanation of the Machine (Telegraphe) placed on the Mountain of Bellville near Paris, for the Purpose of Communicating Intelligence". That latter article is accompanied by an illustration of the "French Telegraphe" on the facing page. Claude Chappe developed the system for the French optical telegraph in the 1790's, approximately 50 years before Morse's electro-mechanic telegraph. Using a system of semaphore signals making up 92 configurations, Chappe developed a code book with 92 pages, each with 92 lines. Entire messages could thus be transmitted across France via telegraph stations placed nearly 6 miles apart. A "Proposal for an Improvement of the Telegraph" is published on page 1,177 of the Supplement, below a quarter page woodcut illustration of the device. "A Speculation on the Origin and characteristical Manners of the Picts and Scotts" appears on pages 881 through 884 of the October issue and is continued on pages 997 through 1,000 of the November issue. Of the contents in these volumes perhaps the most noteworthy is an early description of plastic surgery under the heading of "Curious Surgical Operation" describing a surgical procedure performed in India to replace a man's nose, grafting skin over wax to build a new nose. This procedure is illustrated in the plate facing page 883 showing a portrait of a turbaned man whose nose has thus been replaced above vignettes illustrating the steps involved in the procedure. A further article, appearing on page 1,093, takes exception with the earlier author's statement that such a procedure is unknown in the West, quoting Butler's "Hudibras" which asserts that Taliacotius, surgeon to the Grand Duke of Tuscany had laid out a similar procedure and citing reference to a similar feat of plastic surgery having been performed on a virgin by the Italian surgeon Griffonius in the 1590's and that a chapter in "Chirurgorum Comes", printed in 1687, is dedicated to the subject. Rhinoplasty is said to have originated with the Hindu surgeon Susrata somewhere around the year 500. A description of his method was translated into Arabic in the 700s and into English in the 18th century. Other methods of rhinoplasty included that developed in Italy by Gaspare Tagliacozzi in the 1500s, but British interest in the Indian method of total rhinoplasty, fully described in the article signed "B.L." was partly spurred on by Tipu Sultan, the ruler of Mysore, offering rewards and bounties for noses, ears or bullocks brought back after a raid. Syphilis also contributed to the interest in the procedure. This article by B.L. (the anonymous author who was thought by some to be Colley Lucas and by others to be Barak Longmate, the engraver of the plate illustrating the article) fired the imagination of the surgeon John Constantine, who practiced on corpses, and of John Carpue who, in 1816, published his results in a landmark work. The article published in the form of a letter in "The Gentleman's Magazine" was the first report published in Europe on the Hindu method of rhinoplasty.

A wonderful 18th century periodical which provides insight into the intellectual culture of the period with its coverage of politics, current affairs and news, history and literature. First Edition. 
Price: 1500.00 USD

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187 Nicolson, Harold KINGS, COURTS AND MONARCHY
NY: Simon and Schuster, 1962. 1962. Very good 
NY: Simon and Schuster, 1962.. 1962.. Very good. - Large 8vo, navy blue cloth (lightly bumped & rubbed; covers slightly warped) titled in gilt. 335 pp. B&W pictorial endpapers, tipped-in color frontispiece, color plates & full-page & textual B&W illustrations. Very good.

First American edition.

A study of monarchy from the king as magician in primitive societies to the modern British monarchy. First Edition. 
Price: 20.00 USD

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188 Norman, Gertrude. A BRIEF HISTORY OF BAVARIA. By Gertrude Norman. Second edition, revised and corrected by Reginald Maxse.
Munich: English and American Bookstore / Heinrich Jaffe, 1910. 1910. Good 
- Octavo, bound in limp dark green cloth titled in gilt on the front cover and the spine. The covers are rubbed and bumped with a small stain to the rear cover. x, 211 & [1] pages. The endpapers and pastedowns are darkened and soiled. The pages are slightly toned with occasional soiling and a very few pencil marks. Good.

Second edition. 
Price: 20.00 USD

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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY BRITISH CONSERVATIVE POLITICIAN STAFFORD NORTHCOTE, 1ST EARL OF IDDESLEIGH., Northcote, Stafford, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. (1818-1887). British Conservative politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Foreign Secretary.
189 Northcote, Stafford, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh. (1818-1887). British Conservative politician who served as Chancellor of the Exchequer and Foreign Secretary. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED BY BRITISH CONSERVATIVE POLITICIAN STAFFORD NORTHCOTE, 1ST EARL OF IDDESLEIGH.
Pynes, Exeter, U.K: September 26, 1869. 1869. Good Signed
Pynes, Exeter, U.K: September 26, 1869.. 1869.. Good. - Letter penned in black ink & filling 2 sides of his cream-colored letterhead which is folded once to form 4 sides, each 7 inches high by 4- 1/2 inches wide, with his address printed in blind at the top of the first side. Signed "Stafford H. Northcote". The letter is lightly creased with the top edge of each side slightly darkened. The top section of the 4th side has been tipped onto a slip of cream-colored stiff paper. Good.

Northcote writes to a Mr. E. Pears asking him to send a copy of a speech to Mr. Perrin. "Shall you be able to send him one before Tuesday? If not, I will send him some slips. Perhaps you will kindly telegraph to me tomorrow, to say whether you have had the address printed, and whether I shall have a copy before I go to Bristol...."

Stafford Henry Northcote, 1st Earl of Iddesleigh [1818-1887] was a British Conservative politician. He served as Chancellor of the Exchequer between 1874 and 1880 and as Foreign Secretary between 1885 and 1886. He was one of only two people to hold the office of First Lord of the Treasury without being Prime Minister. First Edition. 
Price: 75.00 USD

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190 O'Brien, Rita Cruise WHITE SOCIETY IN BLACK AFRICA: The French in Senegal
London, U.K.: Faber and Faber Limited, (1972). (1972). Very good 
London, U.K.: Faber and Faber Limited, (1972).. (1972).. Very good. - Octavo, cloth in a dust wrapper. The dust jacket is slightly rubbed with some very minor soiling to its rear panel & a tiny crease to its rear flap. 320 pages. Illustrated in black & white with maps, cartoons & tables. Near fine in a very good dust wrapper.

First edition.

A study of the effects of French colonization of Senegal on the country's post- independence society. Dust jacket present. First Edition. 
Price: 20.00 USD

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TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY HISTORIAN AND POLITICAL SCIENTIST SAUL K. PADOVER AS DEAN OF THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH., Padover, Saul K. (1905-1981). A historian and political scientist at the New School for Social Research in New York City.
191 Padover, Saul K. (1905-1981). A historian and political scientist at the New School for Social Research in New York City. TYPED LETTER SIGNED BY HISTORIAN AND POLITICAL SCIENTIST SAUL K. PADOVER AS DEAN OF THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH.
New York: November 15, 1950. 1950. Very good Signed
New York: November 15, 1950.. 1950.. Very good. - 37 words typed on a sheet of New School letterhead, 8-1/2 inches high by 5-1/2 inches wide. Signed in green ink "Saul K. Padover". His title "Dean" is typed below the signature. There is creasing to the letterhead at top left. Folded once for mailing. Together with a carbon copy of the recipient's letter. Very good.

Harold Rugg of Teachers College, Columbia University has written to Padover, seeking to change the date of Padover's meeting with Rugg's Luncheon Forum. Padover replies; "The date (November 29th) and topic are fine. I am looking forward to the pleasure of making your acquaintance and of addressing the group."

Saul K. Padover [1905-1981] was a historian and political scientist at the New School of Social Research in New York City. He wrote or edited definitive studies of Karl Marx, Joseph II of Austria, Louis XVI of France and three American founding fathers--Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and Thomas Jefferson. He joined the graduate faculty of the New School in 1949 and remained there until his death in 1981.

One of the most significant educators during the Progressive era of education, Harold Rugg [1886-1960] was a professor of education at Teachers College of Columbia University. A civil engineer, he had become interested in how students learn and pursued a doctorate in education. He was responsible for producing the very first series of school textbooks from 1929 until the 1940s. 
Price: 45.00 USD

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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by British Admiral LORD CLARENCE PAGET on ADMIRALTY LETTERHEAD., Paget, Lord Clarence. (1811-1895). British Admiral.
192 Paget, Lord Clarence. (1811-1895). British Admiral. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by British Admiral LORD CLARENCE PAGET on ADMIRALTY LETTERHEAD.
[London]: August 12, 1865. 1865. Very good Signed
- 22 words penned in black ink on a cream sheet of embossed "Admiralty Whitehall' letterhead, approximately 7-1/4 inches high by 4-1/2 inches wide. Signed "Yours truly / C. Paget". Folded twice for mailing. Near fine.

A letter recommending a Dixon for the position of Customs House Boatswain.

Admiral Lord Clarence Edward Paget, KCB was a British sailor, politician and sculptor. The younger son of the 1st Marquess of Anglesey, he entered the Royal Navy in 1827 as midshipman on the battleship HMS Asia and took part in the Battle of Navarino in that year. He was promoted to Commander in 1834 and to Captain in 1829. He entered Parliament as a member for Sandwich in 1837, retaining this seat until 1852. He served in the Crimean War, was appointed Secretary to the Admiralty in 1859 and was promoted to Vice Admiral in 1865. He was Commander-in-Chief, Mediterranean Fleet from 1866 to 1869.

From the autograph collection of Mary Ford, widow of Richard Ford who wrote the popular "Handbook for Travellers in Spain". First Edition. 
Price: 125.00 USD

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193 Pakenham, Valerie OUT IN THE NOONDAY SUN: Edwardians in the Tropics
New York: Random House, (1985). (1985). 0394522567 / 9780394522562 Very good 
New York: Random House, (1985).. (1985).. Very good. - Quarto, cloth, in a dust wrapper. The book is cocked. The rear panel of the dust jacket is lightly rubbed & soiled & there are 2 chips out of the dust jacket's top edge. 255 pages. Profuse black-and-white illustrations. There is a remainder mark on the top edge. Very good. Dust jacket present. 
Price: 10.00 USD
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AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by COUNT LUIGI PALFFY as Governor of the Venetian Provinces under Austrian rule, regarding permission for the French-born American writer (later Civil War officer) Baron Regis de Trobriand to examine historical archives in Venice., Palffy (Palffi), Count Luigi. Governor of the Venetian Provinces.
194 Palffy (Palffi), Count Luigi. Governor of the Venetian Provinces. AUTOGRAPH LETTER SIGNED by COUNT LUIGI PALFFY as Governor of the Venetian Provinces under Austrian rule, regarding permission for the French-born American writer (later Civil War officer) Baron Regis de Trobriand to examine historical archives in Venice.
Venice, November 21, 1844. 1844. Very goodq Signed
Venice, November 21, 1844.. 1844.. Very goodq. - Over 115 words penned on both sides of fine 11 inch high by 8-1/4 inch wide paper. In his letter, addressed to Monsieur Le Baron Trobriand, the Governor of the Venetian Provinces Count Luigi Palffy has the honor to inform Trobriand that the directors of the Venetian Archives have been authorized to allow the Baron to examine documents relating to the history of Venice through the 14th Century: "J'ai l'honneur de vous prevenir, Monsieur le Baron, que la Direction des Archives de Venise a ete autorisee de vous accorder l'inspection des documents qui y existent jusqu'a la fin du Siecle XIV relatifs a l'histoire de Venise...." Count Palffy goes on to inform the Baron that documents relating to the subsequent period of Venetian history belong to the Aulique Chancellery in Vienna, Austria and that he would need to contact them and outline the specific era of the documents he would like to examine. Signed "Palffy". Folded for mailing, there is some minor faint foxing and the edges and corners of the letter are slightly creased with a tiny tear to the bottom edge.

Count Luigi Palffy was Governor General of the Venetian Provinces under Austrian rule.

Established in 1815, the Kingdom of Lombardy-Venetia was a constituent land of the Austrian Empire until it's dissolution in 1866 when the remaining territory fell to Italy.

The French aristocrat, lawyer, poet, and novelist Philippe Regis Denis de Keredern de Trobriand (1816-1897) emigrated, on a dare, to the United States while still in his 20s. He became naturalized as an American citizen during the American Civil War. He published his first novel "Gentlemen of the West" in 1840 and. after settling in New York City, became quite popular with the social elite. He published his second novel "The Rebel" in New York in 1841. After marrying Mary Mason Jones, the daughter of a wealthy American Banker, he and his new wife moved to Venice for a time, where they socialized with the local nobility. It seems likely that the letter offered above was penned during Trobriand's residence in that city. Returning to New York, he wrote for and edited French language publications. Naturalized as a citizen of the United States after the outbreak of the Civil War, Trobriand was commissioned as an officer in command of the 55th New York Infantry known as the Gardes Lafayette. He took part in the 1862 Peninsula Campaign and the Battle of Williamsburg. As a Colonel in command of the newly merged 55th and 38th, he led his new regiment in the Battle of Chancellorsville. He saw significant action at Gettysburg where every third man in his brigade was a casualty. Promoted to Brigadier-General by President Lincoln in 1864, he participated in the Petersburg and Appomattox Campaigns. He returned to France after the war to write about his experiences. While there, General Ulysses S. Grant appointed him as colonel to command the31st Regiment of Infantry. Trobriand requested a leave of absence to complete his book "Quatre ans de campagnes a l'Armee du Potomac" (Four Years with the Army of the Potomac), which Grant kindly granted. Returning to the U.S. in 1867, Trobriand served in the US Army of the West and participated in the Indian Wars. In command of Fort Stevenson in Dakota, Trobriand painted a series of landscapes and portraits of the American Indians of the region. He was subsequently appointed to several posts, including command of the 13th Regiement in New Orleans. In retirement, he and his wife settled in the French Quarter of New Orleans, cultivating roses, painting, reading and writing. He wrote "Vie militaire dans le Dakota" (Army Life in Dakota) and "Our Noble Blood", both of which were published posthumously. First Edition. 
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195 Paris, Robert HISTOIRE DU FASCISME EN ITALIE. I: des origines a la prise du pouvoir
Paris: Francois Maspero, 1962. 1962. Good 
Paris: Francois Maspero, 1962.. 1962.. Good. - Octavo, softcover bound in printed wrappers. The binding is lightly bumped & rubbed with light creases to the spine. 364 & [2] pages. There is a previous owner's blind stamp on the front endpaper & there is a very light horizontal crease to each of the last 40 pages of the book. Good.

Cahiers Libres nos. 37-38. The text is in French. 
Price: 15.00 USD

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196 Pepper, Claude D.; Maritain, Jacques; Flanner, Janet; Lord Lytton; Lazarev, Nikolai; Dupont, Pierre; et al FREE WORLD: A Monthly Magazine devoted to Democracy and World Affairs. Volume VI, No. 2. August 1943
New York: Free World, Inc., 1943. 1943. Good 
New York: Free World, Inc., 1943.. 1943.. Good. - Small quarto [approximately 10-1/2 inches high by 7-5/8 inches wide], softcover bound in printed gray & yellow wrappers. The binding is lightly bumped with the edges of the wraps slightly darkened. There is a light vertical crease to the front wrap. Pages [97]-192. Black-and-white illustrations after drawings by Robert Hale, Theodore Brenson & others. The pages are a bit toned & the top page corners are lightly bumped. Good.

Among the contents of this issue, which is largely devoted to World War II, are a Round Table on "The Future of Italy" ; "The Liberated Nations and the New Order" by Claude D. Pepper; articles on France by Jacques Maritain and Janet Flanner; "United States of India" by Lord Lytton; "A Soviet Criticism of Air Power" by Nikolai Lazarev; and "Powder Magazine of the Balkans" by Pierre Dupont. 
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197 Pettit, Edward. THE VISIONS OF GOVERNMENT, &C. Wherein The Antimonarchical Principles and Practices of all Phanatical Commonwealths-men, and Jesuitical Politicians are discovered, confuted, and exposed. As it was Publish'd in the last Year of His late Majesty's happy Reign: With a Preface to it, written in the time of the late Rebellion in the West. By Edward Pettit, M.A. and Author of the Visions of Purgatory, and Thorough Reformations. The Second Edition.
London: Printed by B.W. for Edward Vize, at the Sign of the Bishop's Head over against the Royal Exchange in Cornhill, 1686. 1686. Good 
London: Printed by B.W. for Edward Vize, at the Sign of the Bishop's Head over against the Royal Exchange in Cornhill, 1686.. 1686.. Good. - Octavo, 6-7/8 inches high by 4-3/8 inches wide. Early marbled boards backed with a brown calf spine with raised bands. The covers are rubbed and stained with wear to the marbled paper along the edges and corners. The head and tail of the spine are chipped. The pagination is as follows: Frontispiece, title page, [2] pages, [20] pages, and pages 1 through 248. Illustrated with a folding frontispiece titled "Carolus Everso Missus Succerere Seclo" representing Charles II trampling on a three-headed dragon. The hinges are cracked ad there is evidence of early minor worming to the top edge of the front endpaper. A previous early owner's name is penned on the front endpaper and those of 2 subsequent early owners are penned on the rear endpaper. The folding frontispiece is soiled with several creases, chips and short tears to its front edge and a couple of tears to the frontispiece's inner edge with a small piece out from the bottom corner of the inner edge. The text block is cracked. The tightly cropped pages are toned with some minor soiling and occasional minor foxing. A few page corners are creased. Good.

The second edition. "With a new preface written in the wake of the Western Rebellion against 'the monsters of the age'. The book presented a series of visions condemning fanatics, conspirators, libelers and rebels, and praising English monarchy and the rule of Charles and James." - [Kevin Sharpe: "Rebranding Rule: The Restoration and Revolution Monarchy, 1660-1714"].

The book's frontispiece represents Charles II trampling on a three-headed dragon whose heads are those of a Turk, a Jesuit, and a Puritan. A French fleur- de-lis decorates the dragon's body. The king's right hand extends out to a sword-bearing angel descending from the clouds as Minerva (or possibly Britannia), attired in an armored peplum and plumed helmet, stands at left. Printed below the image are the words "If they who slew the Monsters of the Age, / Inspir'd the old poets with Romantick Rage / What wonders will the times to come relate, / Of Charles from Charles great Brittains Charles ye great...."

The dragon's three heads probably refer to the war waged by Charles II against the Algerines, represented by the Turk, the contest with France during his reign represented by the Jesuit and the King's accession to the throne and his breaking up the Commonwealth being represented by the head of the Puritan. The object of Pettit's work was to advocate the divine authority and rights of Charles II. The King's reign is therefore represented as favored by heaven as he tramples the Hydra of Rebellion with its three heads and his struggle with France, represented by the Fleur-de-lis, which sought the destruction of the English monarchy.

RARE. The ESTC locates only 6 copies of the Second edition in the British Isles and another 6 in North America. 
Price: 950.00 USD

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198 Phelps, Robert; editor TWENTIETH CENTURY CULTURE: The Breaking Up
New York: George Braziller, (1965). (1965). Fine 
New York: George Braziller, (1965).. (1965).. Fine. - Octavo, cloth-backed light blue boards. The spine is slightly sunned. 384 pages. Black-and-white illustrations. Near fine.

First edition.

The century's culture explored through the writings of authors of the time. First Edition. 
Price: 10.00 USD

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199 Prescott, William H HISTORY OF THE CONQUEST OF PERU, / With a Preliminary View of the Civilization of the Incas. In Two Volumes
New York: Harper and Brothers, 1847. 1847. Good 
New York: Harper and Brothers, 1847.. 1847.. Good. - Octavo, olive green cloth titled in gilt with a crest in gilt & decorative bands in blind on the spine & with decorative frames in blind on both covers. The bindings are rubbed & lightly bumped and the spines & extremities are faded. xl & 527 pages; and xix & 547 pages. Illustrated in black & white with a portrait frontispiece with a tissue guard in each volume & with a facsimile plate & a map. There is an owner's signature on the front pastedown of each volume. There is a light crease to each of the last few leaves of Vol. 1 with a tiny tear to the front edge of the rear endpaper. There is foxing & staining throughout both volumes. Good.

First American edition, State B with no printer listed on the copyright page [BAL 16346]. First Edition. 
Price: 200.00 USD

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200 Prince de Joinville MEMOIRS (VIEUX SOUVENIRS) OF THE PRINCE DE JOINVILLE
New York and London: Macmillan & Co., 1895. 1895. Good 
New York and London: Macmillan & Co., 1895.. 1895.. Good. - Octavo, decorative cream & golden yellow cloth. The binding is lightly bumped & soiled. The spine & extremities are darkened & the gilt titling on the spine is faded. Half-title, title & 371 pages. Numerous black-and- white vignettes & textual illustrations by the author. A few overlapping page edges are creased & chipped and there is scattered foxing throughoout. Good.

First American edition.

Translated from the French by Lady Mary Loyd.

From the library of Civil War veteran Louis Livingston with his signature dated 1895 at the top of the title page.

François-Ferdinand-Philippe-Louis-Marie d'Orléans, prince de Joinville (1818-1900) was the third son of Louis Philippe, Duke of Orléans, afterwards king of the French, and his wife Marie Amalie of Bourbon-Sicilies. He was an admiral of the French Navy and a writer on military topics who was prominent in the modernization of the French Navy. The memoirs cover the period from his birth in 1818 to the revolution of 1848. First Edition. 
Price: 25.00 USD

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